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On Email Personalization, Design Optimization and Customer Engagement

Weekly Email Marketing News Digest

This week’s email marketing series has a Valentine’s Day slant as marketers sift through emails to find out what’s trending in the season where love is in the air. They tell you what they’re in love with… or not.

From Bad First Date to Love: How ProFlowers’ Valentine’s Day Emails Won Me Over

Real life examples are often far more compelling than theoretical talk. Here’s the story of how ProFlowers first got personalization wrong… before they got it right. As they say, practice makes perfect! Here’s the version that got the thumbs up:

valentines-day-promo

Love May Be in the Air, But It’s Not in the Inbox

There’s a little less love in the inbox this year as compared to last. On Feb 5 2013, there were only 11% Valentine’s Day themed emails. Last year on the same day it was 14%. On Feb 9, where you’d expect retailers to be ramping up their activities, the percentage fell further from 13% last year to 6% this year.

valentines-day-email-chart

What’s increasing this year is the percentage of heart symbols used in email subject lines. On Feb 8, 8% of emails were using this tactic as compared to none last year.

Unsurprisingly, the words “free”, “shipping” and “save” were the three most used words in emails during the last few weeks.

UK DMers Advance New Engagement Metric

Will the open/reach metric be the next big thing in email marketing?

If a group of UK DMA (Direct Marketing Association) members have their way, that metric could become the reality for many emarketers.

The open/reach metric is defined as the number of people who have opened a marketer’s email at least once over a given period of time, from a quarter to a year, depending on the frequency of mailings.

Engagement is currently measured by open, clicks and conversions. The need to drive these metrics have led to marketers trimming their lists when it comes to ‘inactive’ subscribers – perhaps needlessly some claim. While this group of subscribers does not click frequently on mailings, they may well respond sporadically.

Do you remember us?

Our client, Dennis Dayman from Eloqua shares his experience with what he first thought was spam mail. It turned out to be a welcome email practicing one of the tenets of email marketing best practices – The Unsubscribe Option.

valentines-day-notification

Drive Frequency. Drive Subscribers. Drive Marketing

“Anyone without an email address is the digital equivalent of a homeless person.” – Dela Quist, Founder & CEO, Alchemy Worx

Quist’s advice to the audience at the Email Evolution Conference was to organically grow email databases and amplify email frequency. Increasing the frequency of email is something that lies in the grey area as emarketers often fear being labelled a spammer.

Quist urges emarketers to give consumers a chance to get around to opening emails. How so? By giving them more opportunities to open emails with more emails. According to Quist, email frequency can drive engagement between a brand and customers. It also links email to other channels. However, it’s a good idea to understand consumer behavior on those channels before embarking on a cross-channel strategy to optimize the impact of the email.

And there you have it, The Valentine’s Day edition!

Ready to start acting on Quist’s advice and start pumping out emails? Download our free white paper on Overcoming The Challenges of High Volume Sending!

Overcoming The Challenges of High Volume Sending

 

Comments

  1. I strongly believe that while doing Email Marketing , the information we are trying to convey should be presented in the first fold of the website itself instead of scrolling down to the bottom to find the information. Apart from that other factors like attractive banners and impressive landing page should definitely help

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